Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs

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A fun way to color eggs and use up kitchen scraps, all the the same time.  Experiment with what scraps you have and see what comes of it.  It’s all part of the fun.  I will give you an example of four colors you can create to get you started.

Growing up, our family tradition included dying easter eggs.  We would use little color tablets that you dropped into a cup of vinegar to dissolve, then dipped the egg in using a wire loop that holds the egg.  It was always a mess and the dye stayed on your skin forever.  Not that there is anything wrong with that, it’s all part of the process of making memories.  However, what I’ve discovered about naturally dying eggs, I didn’t experience a transfer of color onto my skin.

Once I met my husband I was introduced to the Czech culture.  Their easter traditions are far more interesting than my own.  The eggs are painted, or wax coated before adding color, as you will see in my pictures.  I used a pin with a flat top, dipped into melted beeswax to create the design on the eggs.  The eggs are then dipped in to the dye.  Once the eggs have achieved the desired shade, They are removed from the dye, dried, and placed over a heat source to remove the wax with a towel.  It’s a beautiful process.  If you do want to try this process, make sure to use beeswax.  Traditional candle or crayon wax is too soft and hard to work with.

Blue

 

To create a beautiful blue you will use a red cabbage. It doesn’t take much at all.  I used the end/core of the cabbage that had very little color on it and as you can see the blue color on the egg is just as vibrant.  You are welcome to use more. Cut the cabbage into smaller pieces and place into a pot with the water, vinegar, and salt. Boil to reduce in half and strain the liquid through a small wire mesh to remove any large debris. Produces approx. 3 cups. cool fully before using as a dye.  Soaking the egg for 30 minutes will produce a light blue, leave for longer or overnight for a dark blue.

1 Cup Red Cabbage

2 Tablespoons Vinegar

1 Teaspoon Salt

6 Cups Water

Yellow

To create a bright yellow I used carrots and turmeric.  I used about a cup of carrot pulp from my juicer and a tablespoon of turmeric.  Place the carrots and turmeric in a pot with the water, vinegar and salt.  Boil to reduce in half and strain the liquid through a small wire mesh to remove any large debris. Produces approx. 3 cups. Soaking for 30 minutes will produce a light yellow, leave for longer or overnight for a bright yellow.

1 Cup Chopped Carrots, or Carrot scraps

2 Tablespoons Vinegar

1 Teaspoon Salt

6 Cups Water

 

 

 

Red-Brown

Beets product a nice and rich burgundy color.  I thought it would make pink, and I suppose it would if you left it in the color for less time. The ones pictured were left in the color overnight.  I used two beets, cut into small pieces.  I later used the cooked beets in my salad.  Place the chopped beets into a pot of water, add the vinegar and salt. Boil to reduce in half and strain the liquid through a small wire mesh to remove any large debris.

2 Beets chopped and stems removed (clean the beets well with water and a brush if you plan to eat them after)

2 Tablespoons Vinegar

1 Teaspoon Salt

6 Cups Water

 

 

 

 

 

Green-Blue

To produce a green-ish blue you will first dip the egg in yellow, then blue.  It produces a color that most resembles that of an egg laid by an araucana chicken.