Devilish Fried Eggs

I seriously have eggs coming out of my ears after Easter.  I don’t remember deviled eggs being an easter tradition, however it was a great way to use up all those hard boiled eggs we had dyed.  I grew up in a household with three other siblings.  My sweet mother would boil a dozen eggs for each of us to dye.  Which means we have 4 dozen hard boiled eggs to consume after easter is over.  How do you eat 4 dozen hard boiled eggs?!?! You get creative!!! No way I am eating egg salad sandwiches for the next week!  I need a little variety.  Since I now have my own fair share of hard boiled eggs, I came up with this devilish alternative to deviled eggs.

I had an unfortunate mishap that included deviled eggs and food poisoning at a funeral, I have since been unable to eat any mixture of mayonnaise and hard boiled egg, therefore this recipe has become a great alternative. No Mayo, no mustard!  Take a peek at the ingredients and give this recipe a try.  It’s worth every ounce of energy put into making them.


Print Recipe
Devilish Fried Eggs
Prep Time 15 Minutes
Cook Time 20 Minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Batter
Eggs/Yoke filling
Prep Time 15 Minutes
Cook Time 20 Minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Batter
Eggs/Yoke filling
Instructions
Prepare the Egg Whites
  1. Start by boiling your eggs. Bring a pot full of water to a boil before gently placing the eggs in the hot water. I use a ladle to place the eggs in the water to avoid cracking. I will usually boil to additional eggs for incidentals. Incase an egg cracks while boiling or something else happens in the cooking process. Boil for 10 minutes, no longer than 15. After the eggs are cooked, run the eggs under cold water to cool and release the egg from the shell and peel once cool enough to touch. Tap the egg on the counter to crack the shell and peel the egg to remove the shell.
  2. Slice the egg in half, remove the yoke and set aside for later use. Rinse the white part of the egg to remove excess yoke and place on a towel to dry.
  3. Make the batter. combine the flour and water in a bowl, mixing until no clumps remain. season with salt. Place the white part of the egg into the batter with the yoke hole facing up. using your finger, coat the inside and top of the egg with batter. Then transfer to a bowl filled with panko bread crumbs. Coat the egg with bread crumbs until no egg white can be seen. Place the breaded egg on a baking sheet or plate for later frying.
  4. Pre-heat the oil on the stove. To test if the oil is ready, toss a bread crumb into the oil and see if it bubbles. If so, it's ready. Add the breaded yokes to the oil one by one to fry them. fry until golden brown. Turn them out, once cooked, onto a towel to remove excess oil.
Prepare the Yoke Filling
  1. In a sauce pan, sauté the peppers and green onions in two tablespoons oil to extract their flavor. Reduce the heat and let the pan cool a little before adding the milk, cheese and cream cheese. Adding these ingredients too soon to a hot pan can cause them to curdle.
  2. Cook the ingredients until it begins to thicken enough to hold shape when piped through a piping bag and tip when cooled. Stir often to prevent curdling or clumps.
  3. Once the ingredients have reached the desired thickness, remove from heat and let cool enough to spoon into a piping bag. While it cools, fry the egg whites.
  4. Once the breaded egg whites are fried, pipe the prepared yoke filling into the hole in the egg white, that once contained the yoke. Garnish with cilantro, smoked paprika and a sliced jalapeño.